backlit buttons

CybeRider

Trusted Helper
#21
The AAA batteries I have are 1000mAh
Way to go, @Villa. But I think those cost probably more than I quoted above. I agree we should care to choose also quality above price. I just meant price might not be an issue nowadays as fairly good quality can be cheap, should we not aim for excel chracteristcs. I always cared for Sony or Panasonic for the cameras, but with the late aquisition of a new remote I got these ReCyko AAA 950mAh, which were in a promotion, 4 batteries - 9 euros.

So far they are performing so well that I hope to be back with the review in 6 years time. :)
 

Skynet

Administrator
#22
Another good thing to know : When the rechargeable batteries are out of power, don't wait months to recharge them again. They need to keep "few power" to stay alive.
 

Villa

Administrator
#23
Way to go, @Villa. But I think those cost probably more than I quoted above. I agree we should care to choose also quality above price. I just meant price might not be an issue nowadays as fairly good quality can be cheap, should we not aim for excel chracteristcs. I always cared for Sony or Panasonic for the cameras, but with the late aquisition of a new remote I got these ReCyko AAA 950mAh, which were in a promotion, 4 batteries - 9 euros.

So far they are performing so well that I hope to be back with the review in 6 years time. :)
I always use Varta and pay around 8 euros for a pack of 4. The price difference between Varta 800 mAh and 1000 mAh is only around a euro.
I have tried lower capacity and cheaper batteries (Not Varta) but they need charging more often.
 

CybeRider

Trusted Helper
#24
Another good thing to know : When the rechargeable batteries are out of power, don't wait months to recharge them again. They need to keep "few power" to stay alive.
Years ago I learned an important lesson on that regard @Skynet. Because of the increasing quality of the mobile phone cameras, I left a mini camera unatended for long. Unlike Li-ion/Li-po batteries that tend to keep charge for longer, Ni-MH batteries tend to drop charge, and capacity after they fully discharge, in shorter time when stocked, and so we have to keep that in mind. When I got back to my AA camera batteries they were discharged. I charged them and checked voltage, they had about 1.6 v each, which was fine, yet the camera refused to work. I tried all I could (the charger you recommend above would have been very useful) and was about to throw the camera in the bin, when I found out from reading around that a multimeter is not capable to determine the capacity in the batteries. The voltage can be correct but if the battery can't hold the minimum required capacity then it is time to dump it.

The above is good for any device and any rechargeable batteries. So, if your Backlit remote is not holding the batteries long enough it might well be because of the batteries capacity, even when you are sure they get to fully charge to their maximum voltage, and you then need something more technologically advanced then a multimeter or a common simple charger to check that out.

Because of laptop cells I had to do a recent research on the popular 18650 cells (did you know a Tesla car runs on over 7000 of these tiny things wheighting around 540kg?). And I found out we should stay away of some cheap sold cells advertised to be ultra high capacity, such as 9000 mAh or over, because when tested they can be in reality less than 2000. So unfortunately the fact you bought new cells for your remote is not a gurantee that you get what is mentioned in the store package. Before dumping your remote it might be worth it to proceed to further battery testing.
 
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ArcticWolf

Trusted Helper
#25
Years ago I learned an important lesson on that regard @Skynet. Because of the increasing quality of the mobile phone cameras, I left a mini camera unatended for long. Unlike Li-ion/Li-po batteries that tend to keep charge for longer, Ni-MH batteries tend to drop charge, and capacity after they fully discharge, in shorter time when stocked, and so we have to keep that in mind. When I got back to my AA camera batteries they were discharged. I charged them and checked voltage, they had about 1.6 v each, which was fine, yet the camera refused to work. I tried all I could (the charger you recommend above would have been very useful) and was about to throw the camera in the bin, when I found out from reading around that a multimeter is not capable to determine the capacity in the batteries. The voltage can be correct but if the battery can't hold the minimum required capacity then it is time to dump it.

The above is good for any device and any rechargeable batteries. So, if your Backlit remote is not holding the batteries long enough it might well be because of the batteries capacity, even when you are sure they get to fully charge to their maximum voltage, and you then need something more technologically advanced then a multimeter or a common simple charger to check that out.

Because of laptop cells I had to do a recent research on the popular 18650 cells (did you know a Tesla car runs on over 7000 of these tiny things wheighting around 540kg?). And I found out we should stay away of some cheap sold cells advertised to be ultra high capacity, such as 9000 mAh or over, because when tested they can be in reality less than 2000. So unfortunately the fact you bought new cells for your remote is not a gurantee that you get what is mentioned in the store package. Before dumping your remote it might be worth it to proceed to further battery testing.

What you're referring to is nominal voltage. As a cell discharges its output continuously drops. Old cells can struggle to reach their nominal voltage or when they've gone through many cycles.

I'm an avid vaper so I have a several dozen 18650's & Lipo packs knocking around as well, obviously that particular application is very high drain indeed & 18650's need to be well cared for when used individually.

One thing you really don't want to dick around with are the cheap knock off cells making ridiculous claims that their 3000 or 3500 mAh cells can output 35 Amps etc. (Just ask a vaper using a mechanical mod to short the battery who's just blown half their face off whilst using what's essentially a pipe bomb!!)

NO manufacturer produces an 18650 anywhere near that!! High drain cells are a wonderful thing that have quite literally changed the world but mess around with them & it can easily bring the literal meaning to getting burnt.

The consumer grade low drain cells are a lot safer but personally I still stick to the better known brands. A little more upfront cost but they definitely pay for themselves in the long run :). Not to mention the sheer waste & helping to avoid toxic landfills full of degrading disposable cells ;)!!
 
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